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Miami's Fight Against Rising Sea Levels

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evilconempire
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Miami's Fight Against Rising Sea Levels

Post by evilconempire » Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:40 am

By Amanda Ruggeri

The first time my father’s basement flooded, it was shortly after he moved in. The building was an ocean-front high-rise in a small city north of Miami called Sunny Isles Beach. The marble lobby had a waterfall that never stopped running; crisp-shirted valets parked your car for you. For the residents who lived in the more lavish flats, these cars were often BMWs and Mercedes. But no matter their value, the cars all wound up in the same place: the basement.

When I called, I’d ask my dad how the building was doing. “The basement flooded again a couple weeks ago,” he’d sometimes say. Or: “It’s getting worse.” It’s not only his building: he’s also driven through a foot of water on a main road a couple of towns over and is used to tiptoeing around pools in the local supermarket’s car park.

Ask nearly anyone in the Miami area about flooding and they’ll have an anecdote to share. Many will also tell you that it’s happening more and more frequently. The data backs them up.

It’s easy to think that the only communities suffering from sea level rise are far-flung and remote. And while places like the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are indeed facing particularly dramatic challenges, they aren’t the only ones being forced to grapple with the issue. Sea levels are rising around the world, and in the US, south Florida is ground zero – as much for the adaptation strategies it is attempting as for the risk that it bears.

One reason is that water levels here are rising especially quickly. The most frequently-used range of estimates puts the likely range between 15-25cm (6-10in) above 1992 levels by 2030, and 79-155cm (31-61in) by 2100. With tides higher than they have been in decades – and far higher than when this swampy, tropical corner of the US began to be drained and built on a century ago – many of south Florida’s drainage systems and seawalls are no longer enough. That means not only more flooding, but challenges for the infrastructure that residents depend on every day, from septic tanks to wells. “The consequences of sea level rise are going to occur way before the high tide reaches your doorstep,” says William Sweet, an oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The flooding would be a challenge for any community, but it poses particular risks here. One recent report estimated that Miami has the most to lose in terms of financial assets of any coastal city in the world, just above Guangzhou, China and New York City. This 120-mile (193km) corridor running up the coast from Homestead to Jupiter – taking in major cities like Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach – is the eighth most populous metropolitan area in the US. It’s also booming. In 2015, the US Census Bureau found that the population of all three counties here was growing – along with the rest of Florida – at around 8%, roughly twice the pace of the US average. Recent studies have shown that Florida has more residents at risk from climate change than any other US state.

(edited for length) Lots of data in the article
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2017040 ... level-rise

-----------

someone should let them know that this is a good thing.
"That Canadian HERO did what the world should do, but not only to the FILTHY muslims but the libturd democrats also!!" - Illeatyourdates

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chucky
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Post by chucky » Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:02 am

evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:40 am
By Amanda Ruggeri

The first time my father’s basement flooded, it was shortly after he moved in. The building was an ocean-front high-rise in a small city north of Miami called Sunny Isles Beach. The marble lobby had a waterfall that never stopped running; crisp-shirted valets parked your car for you. For the residents who lived in the more lavish flats, these cars were often BMWs and Mercedes. But no matter their value, the cars all wound up in the same place: the basement.

When I called, I’d ask my dad how the building was doing. “The basement flooded again a couple weeks ago,” he’d sometimes say. Or: “It’s getting worse.” It’s not only his building: he’s also driven through a foot of water on a main road a couple of towns over and is used to tiptoeing around pools in the local supermarket’s car park.

Ask nearly anyone in the Miami area about flooding and they’ll have an anecdote to share. Many will also tell you that it’s happening more and more frequently. The data backs them up.

It’s easy to think that the only communities suffering from sea level rise are far-flung and remote. And while places like the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are indeed facing particularly dramatic challenges, they aren’t the only ones being forced to grapple with the issue. Sea levels are rising around the world, and in the US, south Florida is ground zero – as much for the adaptation strategies it is attempting as for the risk that it bears.

One reason is that water levels here are rising especially quickly. The most frequently-used range of estimates puts the likely range between 15-25cm (6-10in) above 1992 levels by 2030, and 79-155cm (31-61in) by 2100. With tides higher than they have been in decades – and far higher than when this swampy, tropical corner of the US began to be drained and built on a century ago – many of south Florida’s drainage systems and seawalls are no longer enough. That means not only more flooding, but challenges for the infrastructure that residents depend on every day, from septic tanks to wells. “The consequences of sea level rise are going to occur way before the high tide reaches your doorstep,” says William Sweet, an oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The flooding would be a challenge for any community, but it poses particular risks here. One recent report estimated that Miami has the most to lose in terms of financial assets of any coastal city in the world, just above Guangzhou, China and New York City. This 120-mile (193km) corridor running up the coast from Homestead to Jupiter – taking in major cities like Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach – is the eighth most populous metropolitan area in the US. It’s also booming. In 2015, the US Census Bureau found that the population of all three counties here was growing – along with the rest of Florida – at around 8%, roughly twice the pace of the US average. Recent studies have shown that Florida has more residents at risk from climate change than any other US state.

(edited for length) Lots of data in the article
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2017040 ... level-rise

-----------

someone should let them know that this is a good thing.
The coast shifts all the time . There are frequent storms and if you live right on the ocean or on land that use to be swamps that are below sea level you are going to get flooded. It's just common sense not to build on such areas.
"I’d rather die standing up than live on my knees."
Stephane Charbonnier

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evilconempire
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Post by evilconempire » Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:04 am

chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:02 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:40 am
By Amanda Ruggeri

The first time my father’s basement flooded, it was shortly after he moved in. The building was an ocean-front high-rise in a small city north of Miami called Sunny Isles Beach. The marble lobby had a waterfall that never stopped running; crisp-shirted valets parked your car for you. For the residents who lived in the more lavish flats, these cars were often BMWs and Mercedes. But no matter their value, the cars all wound up in the same place: the basement.

When I called, I’d ask my dad how the building was doing. “The basement flooded again a couple weeks ago,” he’d sometimes say. Or: “It’s getting worse.” It’s not only his building: he’s also driven through a foot of water on a main road a couple of towns over and is used to tiptoeing around pools in the local supermarket’s car park.

Ask nearly anyone in the Miami area about flooding and they’ll have an anecdote to share. Many will also tell you that it’s happening more and more frequently. The data backs them up.

It’s easy to think that the only communities suffering from sea level rise are far-flung and remote. And while places like the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are indeed facing particularly dramatic challenges, they aren’t the only ones being forced to grapple with the issue. Sea levels are rising around the world, and in the US, south Florida is ground zero – as much for the adaptation strategies it is attempting as for the risk that it bears.

One reason is that water levels here are rising especially quickly. The most frequently-used range of estimates puts the likely range between 15-25cm (6-10in) above 1992 levels by 2030, and 79-155cm (31-61in) by 2100. With tides higher than they have been in decades – and far higher than when this swampy, tropical corner of the US began to be drained and built on a century ago – many of south Florida’s drainage systems and seawalls are no longer enough. That means not only more flooding, but challenges for the infrastructure that residents depend on every day, from septic tanks to wells. “The consequences of sea level rise are going to occur way before the high tide reaches your doorstep,” says William Sweet, an oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The flooding would be a challenge for any community, but it poses particular risks here. One recent report estimated that Miami has the most to lose in terms of financial assets of any coastal city in the world, just above Guangzhou, China and New York City. This 120-mile (193km) corridor running up the coast from Homestead to Jupiter – taking in major cities like Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach – is the eighth most populous metropolitan area in the US. It’s also booming. In 2015, the US Census Bureau found that the population of all three counties here was growing – along with the rest of Florida – at around 8%, roughly twice the pace of the US average. Recent studies have shown that Florida has more residents at risk from climate change than any other US state.

(edited for length) Lots of data in the article
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2017040 ... level-rise

-----------

someone should let them know that this is a good thing.
The coast shifts all the time . There are frequent storms and if you live right on the ocean or on land that use to be swamps that are below sea level you are going to get flooded. It's just common sense not to build on such areas.
This isn't just normal flooding due to a storm. lol
"That Canadian HERO did what the world should do, but not only to the FILTHY muslims but the libturd democrats also!!" - Illeatyourdates

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barrysoetoro
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Post by barrysoetoro » Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:14 am

Hey Weather Channel boy, is CO2 causing Miami to flood?
☪ "I am a conservative. One that understands science, which to the uneducated, read you, makes me seem like a liberal", evilcommie

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chucky
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Post by chucky » Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:15 am

evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:04 am
chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:02 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:40 am
By Amanda Ruggeri

The first time my father’s basement flooded, it was shortly after he moved in. The building was an ocean-front high-rise in a small city north of Miami called Sunny Isles Beach. The marble lobby had a waterfall that never stopped running; crisp-shirted valets parked your car for you. For the residents who lived in the more lavish flats, these cars were often BMWs and Mercedes. But no matter their value, the cars all wound up in the same place: the basement.

When I called, I’d ask my dad how the building was doing. “The basement flooded again a couple weeks ago,” he’d sometimes say. Or: “It’s getting worse.” It’s not only his building: he’s also driven through a foot of water on a main road a couple of towns over and is used to tiptoeing around pools in the local supermarket’s car park.

Ask nearly anyone in the Miami area about flooding and they’ll have an anecdote to share. Many will also tell you that it’s happening more and more frequently. The data backs them up.

It’s easy to think that the only communities suffering from sea level rise are far-flung and remote. And while places like the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are indeed facing particularly dramatic challenges, they aren’t the only ones being forced to grapple with the issue. Sea levels are rising around the world, and in the US, south Florida is ground zero – as much for the adaptation strategies it is attempting as for the risk that it bears.

One reason is that water levels here are rising especially quickly. The most frequently-used range of estimates puts the likely range between 15-25cm (6-10in) above 1992 levels by 2030, and 79-155cm (31-61in) by 2100. With tides higher than they have been in decades – and far higher than when this swampy, tropical corner of the US began to be drained and built on a century ago – many of south Florida’s drainage systems and seawalls are no longer enough. That means not only more flooding, but challenges for the infrastructure that residents depend on every day, from septic tanks to wells. “The consequences of sea level rise are going to occur way before the high tide reaches your doorstep,” says William Sweet, an oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The flooding would be a challenge for any community, but it poses particular risks here. One recent report estimated that Miami has the most to lose in terms of financial assets of any coastal city in the world, just above Guangzhou, China and New York City. This 120-mile (193km) corridor running up the coast from Homestead to Jupiter – taking in major cities like Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach – is the eighth most populous metropolitan area in the US. It’s also booming. In 2015, the US Census Bureau found that the population of all three counties here was growing – along with the rest of Florida – at around 8%, roughly twice the pace of the US average. Recent studies have shown that Florida has more residents at risk from climate change than any other US state.

(edited for length) Lots of data in the article
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2017040 ... level-rise

-----------

someone should let them know that this is a good thing.
The coast shifts all the time . There are frequent storms and if you live right on the ocean or on land that use to be swamps that are below sea level you are going to get flooded. It's just common sense not to build on such areas.
This isn't just normal flooding due to a storm. lol
It is a flood prone area. Downtown ST Augustine is too. It is low lying and right on the inlet. It floods mildly every time it rains becuse the land is all built over and there is improper drainage. If you live on land that is just a few feet above sea level and not right on the water you won't have these problems. Expecting the coast to be static is unrealistic.
"I’d rather die standing up than live on my knees."
Stephane Charbonnier

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evilconempire
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Posts: 15139
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Post by evilconempire » Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:22 am

chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:15 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:04 am
chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:02 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:40 am
By Amanda Ruggeri

The first time my father’s basement flooded, it was shortly after he moved in. The building was an ocean-front high-rise in a small city north of Miami called Sunny Isles Beach. The marble lobby had a waterfall that never stopped running; crisp-shirted valets parked your car for you. For the residents who lived in the more lavish flats, these cars were often BMWs and Mercedes. But no matter their value, the cars all wound up in the same place: the basement.

When I called, I’d ask my dad how the building was doing. “The basement flooded again a couple weeks ago,” he’d sometimes say. Or: “It’s getting worse.” It’s not only his building: he’s also driven through a foot of water on a main road a couple of towns over and is used to tiptoeing around pools in the local supermarket’s car park.

Ask nearly anyone in the Miami area about flooding and they’ll have an anecdote to share. Many will also tell you that it’s happening more and more frequently. The data backs them up.

It’s easy to think that the only communities suffering from sea level rise are far-flung and remote. And while places like the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are indeed facing particularly dramatic challenges, they aren’t the only ones being forced to grapple with the issue. Sea levels are rising around the world, and in the US, south Florida is ground zero – as much for the adaptation strategies it is attempting as for the risk that it bears.

One reason is that water levels here are rising especially quickly. The most frequently-used range of estimates puts the likely range between 15-25cm (6-10in) above 1992 levels by 2030, and 79-155cm (31-61in) by 2100. With tides higher than they have been in decades – and far higher than when this swampy, tropical corner of the US began to be drained and built on a century ago – many of south Florida’s drainage systems and seawalls are no longer enough. That means not only more flooding, but challenges for the infrastructure that residents depend on every day, from septic tanks to wells. “The consequences of sea level rise are going to occur way before the high tide reaches your doorstep,” says William Sweet, an oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The flooding would be a challenge for any community, but it poses particular risks here. One recent report estimated that Miami has the most to lose in terms of financial assets of any coastal city in the world, just above Guangzhou, China and New York City. This 120-mile (193km) corridor running up the coast from Homestead to Jupiter – taking in major cities like Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach – is the eighth most populous metropolitan area in the US. It’s also booming. In 2015, the US Census Bureau found that the population of all three counties here was growing – along with the rest of Florida – at around 8%, roughly twice the pace of the US average. Recent studies have shown that Florida has more residents at risk from climate change than any other US state.

(edited for length) Lots of data in the article
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2017040 ... level-rise

-----------

someone should let them know that this is a good thing.
The coast shifts all the time . There are frequent storms and if you live right on the ocean or on land that use to be swamps that are below sea level you are going to get flooded. It's just common sense not to build on such areas.
This isn't just normal flooding due to a storm. lol
It is a flood prone area. Downtown ST Augustine is too. It is low lying and right on the inlet. It floods mildly every time it rains becuse the land is all built over and there is improper drainage. If you live on land that is just a few feet above sea level and not right on the water you won't have these problems. Expecting the coast to be static is unrealistic.
It is and that's why it's the first to get hit by the rising sea levels from AGW.
"That Canadian HERO did what the world should do, but not only to the FILTHY muslims but the libturd democrats also!!" - Illeatyourdates

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barrysoetoro
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Post by barrysoetoro » Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:23 am

chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:15 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:04 am
chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:02 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:40 am
By Amanda Ruggeri

The first time my father’s basement flooded, it was shortly after he moved in. The building was an ocean-front high-rise in a small city north of Miami called Sunny Isles Beach. The marble lobby had a waterfall that never stopped running; crisp-shirted valets parked your car for you. For the residents who lived in the more lavish flats, these cars were often BMWs and Mercedes. But no matter their value, the cars all wound up in the same place: the basement.

When I called, I’d ask my dad how the building was doing. “The basement flooded again a couple weeks ago,” he’d sometimes say. Or: “It’s getting worse.” It’s not only his building: he’s also driven through a foot of water on a main road a couple of towns over and is used to tiptoeing around pools in the local supermarket’s car park.

Ask nearly anyone in the Miami area about flooding and they’ll have an anecdote to share. Many will also tell you that it’s happening more and more frequently. The data backs them up.

It’s easy to think that the only communities suffering from sea level rise are far-flung and remote. And while places like the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are indeed facing particularly dramatic challenges, they aren’t the only ones being forced to grapple with the issue. Sea levels are rising around the world, and in the US, south Florida is ground zero – as much for the adaptation strategies it is attempting as for the risk that it bears.

One reason is that water levels here are rising especially quickly. The most frequently-used range of estimates puts the likely range between 15-25cm (6-10in) above 1992 levels by 2030, and 79-155cm (31-61in) by 2100. With tides higher than they have been in decades – and far higher than when this swampy, tropical corner of the US began to be drained and built on a century ago – many of south Florida’s drainage systems and seawalls are no longer enough. That means not only more flooding, but challenges for the infrastructure that residents depend on every day, from septic tanks to wells. “The consequences of sea level rise are going to occur way before the high tide reaches your doorstep,” says William Sweet, an oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The flooding would be a challenge for any community, but it poses particular risks here. One recent report estimated that Miami has the most to lose in terms of financial assets of any coastal city in the world, just above Guangzhou, China and New York City. This 120-mile (193km) corridor running up the coast from Homestead to Jupiter – taking in major cities like Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach – is the eighth most populous metropolitan area in the US. It’s also booming. In 2015, the US Census Bureau found that the population of all three counties here was growing – along with the rest of Florida – at around 8%, roughly twice the pace of the US average. Recent studies have shown that Florida has more residents at risk from climate change than any other US state.

(edited for length) Lots of data in the article
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2017040 ... level-rise

-----------

someone should let them know that this is a good thing.
The coast shifts all the time . There are frequent storms and if you live right on the ocean or on land that use to be swamps that are below sea level you are going to get flooded. It's just common sense not to build on such areas.
This isn't just normal flooding due to a storm. lol
It is a flood prone area. Downtown ST Augustine is too. It is low lying and right on the inlet. It floods mildly every time it rains becuse the land is all built over and there is improper drainage. If you live on land that is just a few feet above sea level and not right on the water you won't have these problems. Expecting the coast to be static is unrealistic.
After Obama got elected, they dropped the Antarctic hole in the ozone layer like a hot potato. They scared people into voting Democrat, and so these scientist-gods could get their money for more research on more junk science.
☪ "I am a conservative. One that understands science, which to the uneducated, read you, makes me seem like a liberal", evilcommie

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chucky
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Post by chucky » Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:31 am

evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:22 am
chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:15 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:04 am
chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:02 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:40 am
By Amanda Ruggeri

The first time my father’s basement flooded, it was shortly after he moved in. The building was an ocean-front high-rise in a small city north of Miami called Sunny Isles Beach. The marble lobby had a waterfall that never stopped running; crisp-shirted valets parked your car for you. For the residents who lived in the more lavish flats, these cars were often BMWs and Mercedes. But no matter their value, the cars all wound up in the same place: the basement.

When I called, I’d ask my dad how the building was doing. “The basement flooded again a couple weeks ago,” he’d sometimes say. Or: “It’s getting worse.” It’s not only his building: he’s also driven through a foot of water on a main road a couple of towns over and is used to tiptoeing around pools in the local supermarket’s car park.

Ask nearly anyone in the Miami area about flooding and they’ll have an anecdote to share. Many will also tell you that it’s happening more and more frequently. The data backs them up.

It’s easy to think that the only communities suffering from sea level rise are far-flung and remote. And while places like the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are indeed facing particularly dramatic challenges, they aren’t the only ones being forced to grapple with the issue. Sea levels are rising around the world, and in the US, south Florida is ground zero – as much for the adaptation strategies it is attempting as for the risk that it bears.

One reason is that water levels here are rising especially quickly. The most frequently-used range of estimates puts the likely range between 15-25cm (6-10in) above 1992 levels by 2030, and 79-155cm (31-61in) by 2100. With tides higher than they have been in decades – and far higher than when this swampy, tropical corner of the US began to be drained and built on a century ago – many of south Florida’s drainage systems and seawalls are no longer enough. That means not only more flooding, but challenges for the infrastructure that residents depend on every day, from septic tanks to wells. “The consequences of sea level rise are going to occur way before the high tide reaches your doorstep,” says William Sweet, an oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The flooding would be a challenge for any community, but it poses particular risks here. One recent report estimated that Miami has the most to lose in terms of financial assets of any coastal city in the world, just above Guangzhou, China and New York City. This 120-mile (193km) corridor running up the coast from Homestead to Jupiter – taking in major cities like Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach – is the eighth most populous metropolitan area in the US. It’s also booming. In 2015, the US Census Bureau found that the population of all three counties here was growing – along with the rest of Florida – at around 8%, roughly twice the pace of the US average. Recent studies have shown that Florida has more residents at risk from climate change than any other US state.

(edited for length) Lots of data in the article
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2017040 ... level-rise

-----------

someone should let them know that this is a good thing.
The coast shifts all the time . There are frequent storms and if you live right on the ocean or on land that use to be swamps that are below sea level you are going to get flooded. It's just common sense not to build on such areas.
This isn't just normal flooding due to a storm. lol
It is a flood prone area. Downtown ST Augustine is too. It is low lying and right on the inlet. It floods mildly every time it rains becuse the land is all built over and there is improper drainage. If you live on land that is just a few feet above sea level and not right on the water you won't have these problems. Expecting the coast to be static is unrealistic.
It is and that's why it's the first to get hit by the rising sea levels from AGW.
Miami is going to continue to flood no matter what is done about AGW. A smart person would move to slightly higher ground.
"I’d rather die standing up than live on my knees."
Stephane Charbonnier

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evilconempire
Ayatollah of Rock-n-Rolla
Posts: 15139
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2014 7:25 am

Post by evilconempire » Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:34 am

chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:31 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:22 am
chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:15 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:04 am
chucky wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:02 am
evilconempire wrote:
Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:40 am
By Amanda Ruggeri

The first time my father’s basement flooded, it was shortly after he moved in. The building was an ocean-front high-rise in a small city north of Miami called Sunny Isles Beach. The marble lobby had a waterfall that never stopped running; crisp-shirted valets parked your car for you. For the residents who lived in the more lavish flats, these cars were often BMWs and Mercedes. But no matter their value, the cars all wound up in the same place: the basement.

When I called, I’d ask my dad how the building was doing. “The basement flooded again a couple weeks ago,” he’d sometimes say. Or: “It’s getting worse.” It’s not only his building: he’s also driven through a foot of water on a main road a couple of towns over and is used to tiptoeing around pools in the local supermarket’s car park.

Ask nearly anyone in the Miami area about flooding and they’ll have an anecdote to share. Many will also tell you that it’s happening more and more frequently. The data backs them up.

It’s easy to think that the only communities suffering from sea level rise are far-flung and remote. And while places like the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are indeed facing particularly dramatic challenges, they aren’t the only ones being forced to grapple with the issue. Sea levels are rising around the world, and in the US, south Florida is ground zero – as much for the adaptation strategies it is attempting as for the risk that it bears.

One reason is that water levels here are rising especially quickly. The most frequently-used range of estimates puts the likely range between 15-25cm (6-10in) above 1992 levels by 2030, and 79-155cm (31-61in) by 2100. With tides higher than they have been in decades – and far higher than when this swampy, tropical corner of the US began to be drained and built on a century ago – many of south Florida’s drainage systems and seawalls are no longer enough. That means not only more flooding, but challenges for the infrastructure that residents depend on every day, from septic tanks to wells. “The consequences of sea level rise are going to occur way before the high tide reaches your doorstep,” says William Sweet, an oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The flooding would be a challenge for any community, but it poses particular risks here. One recent report estimated that Miami has the most to lose in terms of financial assets of any coastal city in the world, just above Guangzhou, China and New York City. This 120-mile (193km) corridor running up the coast from Homestead to Jupiter – taking in major cities like Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach – is the eighth most populous metropolitan area in the US. It’s also booming. In 2015, the US Census Bureau found that the population of all three counties here was growing – along with the rest of Florida – at around 8%, roughly twice the pace of the US average. Recent studies have shown that Florida has more residents at risk from climate change than any other US state.

(edited for length) Lots of data in the article
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2017040 ... level-rise

-----------

someone should let them know that this is a good thing.
The coast shifts all the time . There are frequent storms and if you live right on the ocean or on land that use to be swamps that are below sea level you are going to get flooded. It's just common sense not to build on such areas.
This isn't just normal flooding due to a storm. lol
It is a flood prone area. Downtown ST Augustine is too. It is low lying and right on the inlet. It floods mildly every time it rains becuse the land is all built over and there is improper drainage. If you live on land that is just a few feet above sea level and not right on the water you won't have these problems. Expecting the coast to be static is unrealistic.
It is and that's why it's the first to get hit by the rising sea levels from AGW.
Miami is going to continue to flood no matter what is done about AGW. A smart person would move to slightly higher ground.
Yep, there was always normal flooding associate with storms. The flooding they see now and will continue to see is related to sea level rise from AGW and storms are going to make that even worse.
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JDDJR
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Post by JDDJR » Wed Apr 05, 2017 6:04 am

I'm confused, does AGW cause Ground Subsidence, too?
Someday in the future, South Florida will be one Giant Sinkhole.
Will AGW cause that?

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