The protected class: California state workers

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clusterchuck
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The protected class: California state workers

Post by clusterchuck » Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:49 pm

Thanks to Governor Brown:
State employees involved in sexual harassment are protected from legal proceedings
Cost tax payers in the form of settlement payments AND, when an offending employee is moved to a different department, is free to offend again without consequence. AND, in some cases actually enjoy an increase in pay!

Unbelievable what liberal law makers do to my state.

Giving gropers a break? How California state workers stay employed after big payouts
BY MARJIE LUNDSTROM

Officials at the Porterville Developmental Center in the Sierra foothills won’t allow public tours so the privacy and dignity of the mentally disabled people who live there are protected.

Behind the walls, though, the state facility allegedly was a hotspot of sexual harassment and retaliation among peace officers charged with protecting vulnerable residents.

According to a 2013 federal lawsuit – which cost California taxpayers $1.6 million – five peace officers accused five fellow officers of groping, leering, making vulgar comments, spreading sexually explicit rumors, penning anonymous threatening notes, playing suggestively with a banana, displaying pornographic images on a work computer and other demeaning conduct.

After the first $600,000 settlement was reached, the state acted: It promoted one of the accused officers, David L. Corral, gave him a new title, a 23 percent raise and sent him to a sister facility 200 miles away in Costa Mesa.

Within 16 months, Corral was accused of sexual harassment again. Once again, the state paid out big, this time for $400,000.

“They were moving the problem,” said Los Angeles attorney Paul Hundley, who represented the victim, Jennifer Quinonez, in the second case. “... It was horrendous.”

In California state government, being named in a costly claim is not necessarily a career-breaker, according to a Sacramento Bee examination of sexual harassment cases settled over the past three years.

Of the 16 cases in which individual defendants were named, and payouts were more than $150,000, 10 employees continued to receive pay raises and two were promoted.

As is typical, the departments settled the cases with no admission of wrongdoing.

Corral denies harassing anybody and says he was punished for blowing the whistle on other departmental misconduct. He was dismissed from the first suit after a judge decided the allegations against him weren't "severe enough," and Corral had declared bankruptcy.

Like Corral, though, other defendants in sexual harassment cases have moved around the system.

- A correctional officer accused in a 2012 lawsuit of harassing and stalking a female guard was moved to another maximum security prison 250 miles away, where his total pay steadily rose until he retired in 2017 with a $48,000 annual pension. The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation settled the lawsuit for $750,000.

- One peace officer who was at the center of two sexual harassment and retaliation settlements totaling $1.1 million was granted a state medical retirement, then returned 3½ years later as a post-retirement worker, collecting more pay. Before his return, he had petitioned the state for additional benefits after accusing the Department of Consumer Affairs of ruining his health with all its "groundless" internal investigations into his conduct.

- In at least three instances, accused harassers bounced from one department to another, even after large settlements were reached. A male supervisor at the California Highway Patrol, whose conduct led to a $600,000 settlement, is now at a different department earning 36 percent more than when he joined the CHP in December 2011.

The state acknowledges that its handling of sexual harassment cases has been inconsistent, with some in-house Equal Employment Opportunity officers inadequately trained by their departments. In April, based on advice from a working group, Cabinet Secretary Keely Martin Bosler directed departments to expand training for their EEO officers, update procedures and establish a system to track complaints.

MORE
http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-gov ... 28174.html
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barrysoetoro
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Re: The protected class: California state workers

Post by barrysoetoro » Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:50 pm

clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:49 pm
Thanks to Governor Brown:
State employees involved in sexual harassment are protected from legal proceedings
Cost tax payers in the form of settlement payments AND, when an offending employee is moved to a different department, is free to offend again without consequence. AND, in some cases actually enjoy an increase in pay!

Unbelievable what liberal law makers do to my state.

Giving gropers a break? How California state workers stay employed after big payouts
BY MARJIE LUNDSTROM

Officials at the Porterville Developmental Center in the Sierra foothills won’t allow public tours so the privacy and dignity of the mentally disabled people who live there are protected.

Behind the walls, though, the state facility allegedly was a hotspot of sexual harassment and retaliation among peace officers charged with protecting vulnerable residents.

According to a 2013 federal lawsuit – which cost California taxpayers $1.6 million – five peace officers accused five fellow officers of groping, leering, making vulgar comments, spreading sexually explicit rumors, penning anonymous threatening notes, playing suggestively with a banana, displaying pornographic images on a work computer and other demeaning conduct.

After the first $600,000 settlement was reached, the state acted: It promoted one of the accused officers, David L. Corral, gave him a new title, a 23 percent raise and sent him to a sister facility 200 miles away in Costa Mesa.

Within 16 months, Corral was accused of sexual harassment again. Once again, the state paid out big, this time for $400,000.

“They were moving the problem,” said Los Angeles attorney Paul Hundley, who represented the victim, Jennifer Quinonez, in the second case. “... It was horrendous.”

In California state government, being named in a costly claim is not necessarily a career-breaker, according to a Sacramento Bee examination of sexual harassment cases settled over the past three years.

Of the 16 cases in which individual defendants were named, and payouts were more than $150,000, 10 employees continued to receive pay raises and two were promoted.

As is typical, the departments settled the cases with no admission of wrongdoing.

Corral denies harassing anybody and says he was punished for blowing the whistle on other departmental misconduct. He was dismissed from the first suit after a judge decided the allegations against him weren't "severe enough," and Corral had declared bankruptcy.

Like Corral, though, other defendants in sexual harassment cases have moved around the system.

- A correctional officer accused in a 2012 lawsuit of harassing and stalking a female guard was moved to another maximum security prison 250 miles away, where his total pay steadily rose until he retired in 2017 with a $48,000 annual pension. The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation settled the lawsuit for $750,000.

- One peace officer who was at the center of two sexual harassment and retaliation settlements totaling $1.1 million was granted a state medical retirement, then returned 3½ years later as a post-retirement worker, collecting more pay. Before his return, he had petitioned the state for additional benefits after accusing the Department of Consumer Affairs of ruining his health with all its "groundless" internal investigations into his conduct.

- In at least three instances, accused harassers bounced from one department to another, even after large settlements were reached. A male supervisor at the California Highway Patrol, whose conduct led to a $600,000 settlement, is now at a different department earning 36 percent more than when he joined the CHP in December 2011.

The state acknowledges that its handling of sexual harassment cases has been inconsistent, with some in-house Equal Employment Opportunity officers inadequately trained by their departments. In April, based on advice from a working group, Cabinet Secretary Keely Martin Bosler directed departments to expand training for their EEO officers, update procedures and establish a system to track complaints.

MORE
http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-gov ... 28174.html
And you hate Trump?
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clusterchuck
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Re: The protected class: California state workers

Post by clusterchuck » Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:54 pm

barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:50 pm
clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:49 pm
Thanks to Governor Brown:
State employees involved in sexual harassment are protected from legal proceedings
Cost tax payers in the form of settlement payments AND, when an offending employee is moved to a different department, is free to offend again without consequence. AND, in some cases actually enjoy an increase in pay!

Unbelievable what liberal law makers do to my state.

Giving gropers a break? How California state workers stay employed after big payouts
BY MARJIE LUNDSTROM

Officials at the Porterville Developmental Center in the Sierra foothills won’t allow public tours so the privacy and dignity of the mentally disabled people who live there are protected.

Behind the walls, though, the state facility allegedly was a hotspot of sexual harassment and retaliation among peace officers charged with protecting vulnerable residents.

According to a 2013 federal lawsuit – which cost California taxpayers $1.6 million – five peace officers accused five fellow officers of groping, leering, making vulgar comments, spreading sexually explicit rumors, penning anonymous threatening notes, playing suggestively with a banana, displaying pornographic images on a work computer and other demeaning conduct.

After the first $600,000 settlement was reached, the state acted: It promoted one of the accused officers, David L. Corral, gave him a new title, a 23 percent raise and sent him to a sister facility 200 miles away in Costa Mesa.

Within 16 months, Corral was accused of sexual harassment again. Once again, the state paid out big, this time for $400,000.

“They were moving the problem,” said Los Angeles attorney Paul Hundley, who represented the victim, Jennifer Quinonez, in the second case. “... It was horrendous.”

In California state government, being named in a costly claim is not necessarily a career-breaker, according to a Sacramento Bee examination of sexual harassment cases settled over the past three years.

Of the 16 cases in which individual defendants were named, and payouts were more than $150,000, 10 employees continued to receive pay raises and two were promoted.

As is typical, the departments settled the cases with no admission of wrongdoing.

Corral denies harassing anybody and says he was punished for blowing the whistle on other departmental misconduct. He was dismissed from the first suit after a judge decided the allegations against him weren't "severe enough," and Corral had declared bankruptcy.

Like Corral, though, other defendants in sexual harassment cases have moved around the system.

- A correctional officer accused in a 2012 lawsuit of harassing and stalking a female guard was moved to another maximum security prison 250 miles away, where his total pay steadily rose until he retired in 2017 with a $48,000 annual pension. The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation settled the lawsuit for $750,000.

- One peace officer who was at the center of two sexual harassment and retaliation settlements totaling $1.1 million was granted a state medical retirement, then returned 3½ years later as a post-retirement worker, collecting more pay. Before his return, he had petitioned the state for additional benefits after accusing the Department of Consumer Affairs of ruining his health with all its "groundless" internal investigations into his conduct.

- In at least three instances, accused harassers bounced from one department to another, even after large settlements were reached. A male supervisor at the California Highway Patrol, whose conduct led to a $600,000 settlement, is now at a different department earning 36 percent more than when he joined the CHP in December 2011.

The state acknowledges that its handling of sexual harassment cases has been inconsistent, with some in-house Equal Employment Opportunity officers inadequately trained by their departments. In April, based on advice from a working group, Cabinet Secretary Keely Martin Bosler directed departments to expand training for their EEO officers, update procedures and establish a system to track complaints.

MORE
http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-gov ... 28174.html
And you hate Trump?
No
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barrysoetoro
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Re: The protected class: California state workers

Post by barrysoetoro » Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:56 pm

clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:54 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:50 pm
clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:49 pm
Thanks to Governor Brown:
State employees involved in sexual harassment are protected from legal proceedings
Cost tax payers in the form of settlement payments AND, when an offending employee is moved to a different department, is free to offend again without consequence. AND, in some cases actually enjoy an increase in pay!

Unbelievable what liberal law makers do to my state.

Giving gropers a break? How California state workers stay employed after big payouts
BY MARJIE LUNDSTROM

Officials at the Porterville Developmental Center in the Sierra foothills won’t allow public tours so the privacy and dignity of the mentally disabled people who live there are protected.

Behind the walls, though, the state facility allegedly was a hotspot of sexual harassment and retaliation among peace officers charged with protecting vulnerable residents.

According to a 2013 federal lawsuit – which cost California taxpayers $1.6 million – five peace officers accused five fellow officers of groping, leering, making vulgar comments, spreading sexually explicit rumors, penning anonymous threatening notes, playing suggestively with a banana, displaying pornographic images on a work computer and other demeaning conduct.

After the first $600,000 settlement was reached, the state acted: It promoted one of the accused officers, David L. Corral, gave him a new title, a 23 percent raise and sent him to a sister facility 200 miles away in Costa Mesa.

Within 16 months, Corral was accused of sexual harassment again. Once again, the state paid out big, this time for $400,000.

“They were moving the problem,” said Los Angeles attorney Paul Hundley, who represented the victim, Jennifer Quinonez, in the second case. “... It was horrendous.”

In California state government, being named in a costly claim is not necessarily a career-breaker, according to a Sacramento Bee examination of sexual harassment cases settled over the past three years.

Of the 16 cases in which individual defendants were named, and payouts were more than $150,000, 10 employees continued to receive pay raises and two were promoted.

As is typical, the departments settled the cases with no admission of wrongdoing.

Corral denies harassing anybody and says he was punished for blowing the whistle on other departmental misconduct. He was dismissed from the first suit after a judge decided the allegations against him weren't "severe enough," and Corral had declared bankruptcy.

Like Corral, though, other defendants in sexual harassment cases have moved around the system.

- A correctional officer accused in a 2012 lawsuit of harassing and stalking a female guard was moved to another maximum security prison 250 miles away, where his total pay steadily rose until he retired in 2017 with a $48,000 annual pension. The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation settled the lawsuit for $750,000.

- One peace officer who was at the center of two sexual harassment and retaliation settlements totaling $1.1 million was granted a state medical retirement, then returned 3½ years later as a post-retirement worker, collecting more pay. Before his return, he had petitioned the state for additional benefits after accusing the Department of Consumer Affairs of ruining his health with all its "groundless" internal investigations into his conduct.

- In at least three instances, accused harassers bounced from one department to another, even after large settlements were reached. A male supervisor at the California Highway Patrol, whose conduct led to a $600,000 settlement, is now at a different department earning 36 percent more than when he joined the CHP in December 2011.

The state acknowledges that its handling of sexual harassment cases has been inconsistent, with some in-house Equal Employment Opportunity officers inadequately trained by their departments. In April, based on advice from a working group, Cabinet Secretary Keely Martin Bosler directed departments to expand training for their EEO officers, update procedures and establish a system to track complaints.

MORE
http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-gov ... 28174.html
And you hate Trump?
No
Why do you call him "tRump", like ly'insh#t, evilturd and don?
0 x
☪ "that includes patriots like John Kerry, Wesley Clark, and Jesse Ventura", nobrain

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clusterchuck
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Re: The protected class: California state workers

Post by clusterchuck » Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:00 pm

barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:56 pm
clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:54 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:50 pm
And you hate Trump?
No
Why do you call him "tRump", like ly'insh#t, evilturd and don?
Because he occasionally makes an a$$ of himself, but that doesn't = "hate".
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nolaxride
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Re: The protected class: California state workers

Post by nolaxride » Sat Apr 21, 2018 12:50 am

clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:00 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:56 pm
clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:54 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:50 pm
And you hate Trump?
No
Why do you call him "tRump", like ly'insh#t, evilturd and don?
Because he occasionally makes an a$$ of himself, but that doesn't = "hate".
Hate is a curious emotion. When someone hates you, you've won. When someone hates they are actively thinking about you. Hard to get that kind of attention. Being ignored, OTOH, means you've become a non-entity.
0 x
— "It will be revealed in the coming months that he was in fact born in Kenya" - 17 Nov 2016zxx

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barrysoetoro
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Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2014 7:55 pm

Re: The protected class: California state workers

Post by barrysoetoro » Tue Apr 24, 2018 7:20 pm

clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:00 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:56 pm
clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:54 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:50 pm
And you hate Trump?
No
Why do you call him "tRump", like ly'insh#t, evilturd and don?
Because he occasionally makes an a$$ of himself, but that doesn't = "hate".
If I wanted someone to split hairs with, I'd chime in on evil or his buddy nobrain. So, are you ever gonna say what you actually think of President Trump?

Whining about Trump, you want Hillary? Pick ONE!!!!
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☪ "that includes patriots like John Kerry, Wesley Clark, and Jesse Ventura", nobrain

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barrysoetoro
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Posts: 25876
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Re: The protected class: California state workers

Post by barrysoetoro » Tue Apr 24, 2018 7:21 pm

nolaxride wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 12:50 am
clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:00 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:56 pm
clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:54 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:50 pm
And you hate Trump?
No
Why do you call him "tRump", like ly'insh#t, evilturd and don?
Because he occasionally makes an a$$ of himself, but that doesn't = "hate".
Hate is a curious emotion. When someone hates you, you've won. When someone hates they are actively thinking about you. Hard to get that kind of attention. Being ignored, OTOH, means you've become a non-entity.
That's why the difference between me and you is a person burning the American flag won't get his ass beat if you're around him.
0 x
☪ "that includes patriots like John Kerry, Wesley Clark, and Jesse Ventura", nobrain

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DallasDimeBags
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Re: The protected class: California state workers

Post by DallasDimeBags » Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:03 pm

clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:49 pm
Thanks to Governor Brown:
State employees involved in sexual harassment are protected from legal proceedings
Cost tax payers in the form of settlement payments AND, when an offending employee is moved to a different department, is free to offend again without consequence. AND, in some cases actually enjoy an increase in pay!

Unbelievable what liberal law makers do to my state.

Giving gropers a break? How California state workers stay employed after big payouts
BY MARJIE LUNDSTROM

Officials at the Porterville Developmental Center in the Sierra foothills won’t allow public tours so the privacy and dignity of the mentally disabled people who live there are protected.

Behind the walls, though, the state facility allegedly was a hotspot of sexual harassment and retaliation among peace officers charged with protecting vulnerable residents.

According to a 2013 federal lawsuit – which cost California taxpayers $1.6 million – five peace officers accused five fellow officers of groping, leering, making vulgar comments, spreading sexually explicit rumors, penning anonymous threatening notes, playing suggestively with a banana, displaying pornographic images on a work computer and other demeaning conduct.

After the first $600,000 settlement was reached, the state acted: It promoted one of the accused officers, David L. Corral, gave him a new title, a 23 percent raise and sent him to a sister facility 200 miles away in Costa Mesa.

Within 16 months, Corral was accused of sexual harassment again. Once again, the state paid out big, this time for $400,000.

“They were moving the problem,” said Los Angeles attorney Paul Hundley, who represented the victim, Jennifer Quinonez, in the second case. “... It was horrendous.”

In California state government, being named in a costly claim is not necessarily a career-breaker, according to a Sacramento Bee examination of sexual harassment cases settled over the past three years.

Of the 16 cases in which individual defendants were named, and payouts were more than $150,000, 10 employees continued to receive pay raises and two were promoted.

As is typical, the departments settled the cases with no admission of wrongdoing.

Corral denies harassing anybody and says he was punished for blowing the whistle on other departmental misconduct. He was dismissed from the first suit after a judge decided the allegations against him weren't "severe enough," and Corral had declared bankruptcy.

Like Corral, though, other defendants in sexual harassment cases have moved around the system.

- A correctional officer accused in a 2012 lawsuit of harassing and stalking a female guard was moved to another maximum security prison 250 miles away, where his total pay steadily rose until he retired in 2017 with a $48,000 annual pension. The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation settled the lawsuit for $750,000.

- One peace officer who was at the center of two sexual harassment and retaliation settlements totaling $1.1 million was granted a state medical retirement, then returned 3½ years later as a post-retirement worker, collecting more pay. Before his return, he had petitioned the state for additional benefits after accusing the Department of Consumer Affairs of ruining his health with all its "groundless" internal investigations into his conduct.

- In at least three instances, accused harassers bounced from one department to another, even after large settlements were reached. A male supervisor at the California Highway Patrol, whose conduct led to a $600,000 settlement, is now at a different department earning 36 percent more than when he joined the CHP in December 2011.

The state acknowledges that its handling of sexual harassment cases has been inconsistent, with some in-house Equal Employment Opportunity officers inadequately trained by their departments. In April, based on advice from a working group, Cabinet Secretary Keely Martin Bosler directed departments to expand training for their EEO officers, update procedures and establish a system to track complaints.

MORE
http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-gov ... 28174.html
That is truly shameful.
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nolaxride
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Re: The protected class: California state workers

Post by nolaxride » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:18 am

barrysoetoro wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 7:21 pm
nolaxride wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 12:50 am
clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:00 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:56 pm
clusterchuck wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:54 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 8:50 pm
And you hate Trump?
No
Why do you call him "tRump", like ly'insh#t, evilturd and don?
Because he occasionally makes an a$$ of himself, but that doesn't = "hate".
Hate is a curious emotion. When someone hates you, you've won. When someone hates they are actively thinking about you. Hard to get that kind of attention. Being ignored, OTOH, means you've become a non-entity.
That's why the difference between me and you is a person burning the American flag won't get his ass beat if you're around him.
And what would you do?
1 x
— "It will be revealed in the coming months that he was in fact born in Kenya" - 17 Nov 2016zxx

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